Poster Index

Testing the effectiveness of prevention strategies

Clinical and neurocognitive studies of suicidal behavior (17)  |  Clinical phenotyping of suicidal individuals (23)
Culture, ethnicity and spiritual approaches. New paradigms in suicidology (11)  |  Ethical and methodological challenges and solutions in suicide research (5)
Genetic, epigenetic and gene expression contributors to suicide risk (2)  |  Intervention research for prevention of suicidal behavior (30)
Lifespan differential aspects (from infancy to elderly) (7)  |  Miscellany (assisted suicide, minorities, legal aspects, etc.) (9)
Neurobiological underpinnings of suicidal behavior (3)  |  Novel monitoring strategies for detecting changes in risk over time (4)
Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability (38)  |  Testing the effectiveness of prevention strategies (6)




Testing the effectiveness of prevention strategies


(83) PO-83. Inpatient Programs for the Prevention of Suicide: Brief Review of Scientific Literature & Recommendations

Day: 09 | Time: 10:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Testing the effectiveness of prevention strategies

Authors:Marjan Ghahramanlou-Holloway . Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda - Maryland
-

 Introduction:
Psychiatric hospitalizations, in many countries, are a standard approach in managing suicidal patients identified to be at imminent risk for suicide. Most often, the hospitalization setting may provide a
safe and supportive environment for specialty acute care services and stabilization of a suicidal patient. Yet to date, the majority of interventions that are delivered to suicidal patients during this sensitive
timeframe, within the United States, do not directly target suicide risk. This presentation will provide a brief review of inpatient-based scientific literature in order to best highlight evidence-based or evidence-informed strategies for suicide prevention. Interventions including Post Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT), Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality at Menninger (CAMS-M), Safety Planning, and Teachable Moment Brief Intervention (TMBI) will be very briefly described to highlight innovative strategies for targeting the needs of psychiatrically hospitalized suicidal individuals. We hope that this presentation will allow an opportunity for further dialogue about psychiatric inpatient care for suicidal patients across various countries and some of the best practices for reducing the recurrence of suicidal behaviors post hospital discharge.


(147) PO-147. Suicide rates among 200 patients with severe schizophrenia undergoing community based treatment for 7 years in Spain.

Day: 09 | Time: 10:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Testing the effectiveness of prevention strategies

Authors:Juan J. Fernandez-Miranda . AGC SM -V-SESPA, Gijon-Spain
- Silvia Diaz-Fernandez -

 Introduction:
Adherence to treatment of people with severe schizophrenia is important to reach clinical and rehabilitation goals and to prevent suicidal behaviour.
 Goals:
The purpose of this study was to know the retention in treatment (and reasons for discharge) of people with severe schizophrenia enrolled in a specific programme for them, and also suicide rates.
 Methodology:
A 7-year prospective, observational, open-label and not randomized study of patients with severe schizophrenia (CIE 10: F 20; CGI>=5) undergoing specific severe mental illness program, community based. The study was conducted from September 2008 to September 2015 in Gijón (Spain). (N=200; average age=43.1+/-10.6 years old; 58% men and 42% women). Assessment included the Clinical Global Impression severity scale (CGI-S) and the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule (WHO-DAS). Time in treatment and reasons of discharge were measured, including deaths by suicide.
 Results:
CGI-S at baseline was 5.86+/-0.7. After seven years 46% of patients continued under treatment (CGI-S= 4.2 (0.9); p<0.01); 33% were medical discharged (CGI=3.5 (1.5); p<0.001) and continued non intensive treatment in mental health units; DAS also decreased in the four areas (self-care and employment p<0.01; family and social p<0.005); 7% had moved to other places, continuing treatment there; 10% were voluntary discharges. Ten patients dead during the follow up; four of them committed suicide (2%).
 Conclusions:
Retention of patients with severe schizophrenia in a specific programme, comprehensive and community based, was really high and seemed to be useful to decrease the high rates of suicide among them.
 References:
Brown S et al. 25 year mortality of a community cohort with schizophrenia. Br J Psychiatry 2010. 196: 116-121.
Palmer BA, Pankratz VS, Bostwick JM. The lifetime risk of suicide in schizophrenia: a reexamination. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2005. 62: 247-253.


(152) PO-152. In Reflection Workshops impact on high schoolers? attitudes towards people with mental disorders

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Testing the effectiveness of prevention strategies

Authors:Sasa Kocijancic . Medical faculty, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia
- Anja Plot - Peter Pregelj - Vesna Svab -

 Introduction:
Project named In reflection is a non-profit non-governmental project of Slovenian medical student organisation ? SloMSIC Ljubljana. Its workshops are conducted by medical students and are designed to address and reduce taboos and stigma attached to mental disorders, self-harm and suicide among high schoolers.
 Goals:
The goal was to evaluate the effect of the workshop on high schoolers? attitudes towards mental disorders. Improvement of attitudes towards reduced discrimination scores was expected.
 Methodology:
Workshops of the project In reflection are conducted by two medical students in classrooms of approx. 30 high schoolers and last 2 school hours. Peer to peer method is being used to educate participants on the topic of stigma and mental disorders. We handed out a questionnaire to determine their level of acceptance and negative attitudes towards mental disorders (created by Wolff G.) before and after the workshop in 6 different high schools in Slovenia (539 high schoolers participated, aged between 14?19 in the course of 6 months). Standard paired T-test was used.
 Results:
A total of 486 out of 539 high schoolers responded (90% response rate) before and 425 after the workshop (78,9%). Two age groups were analysed separately: high schoolers aged from 14?16 and from 17?19. The younger groups? attitudes changed positively in 8 out of 10 questions, out of which in 5 questions there was a significant difference (P<0.05). The older groups attitudes changed positively in 8 out of 10 questions, out of which 5 had a significant difference (P<0.05).
 Conclusions:
In reflection workshops of SloMSIC improved attitudes of high schoolers towards people with mental disorders. There was no variation between age groups, the effect was the same in both.
 References:
Wolff G, Pathare S, Craig T, Leff J. Community knowledge of mental illness and reaction to mentally ill people. The British Journal of Psychiatry. 1996 Feb;168(2):191?198.
Pinfold V, Toulmin H, Thornicroft G, et al. Reducing psychiatric stigma and discrimination: evaluation of educational interventions in UK secondary schools. The British Journal of Psychiatry. 2003 Apr;182(4):342?346.
Yoshioka K, Reavley NJ, MacKinnon AJ, Jorm AF. Stigmatising attitudes towards people with mental disorders: results from a survey of Japanese high school students. Psychiatry Res. 2014 Jan;215(1):229?36.
Serra M, Lai A, Buizza C, et al. Beliefs and attitudes among Italian high school students toward people with severe mental disorders. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2013 Apr;201(4):311?8.


(179) PO-179. The suicide and depression prevention strategies in Taiwan

Day: 09 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Testing the effectiveness of prevention strategies

Authors:Ya-hsing Yeh . John Tung Foundation, Taipei City-Taiwan
- Chia-chen Chan - I-chun Tai - Li-ting Li - Bing-ting Hsieh - Ming-chieh Lin -

 Introduction:
To introduce the prevention strategies and current situation regarding suicide and depression prevention in Taiwan.
 Goals:
To explain the correlation between suicide prevention and depression prevention through the promotion of suicide prevention strategy and the data information of Taiwan’s suicide population, and introduce different ways of promoting the suicide prevention and their influences.
 Methodology:
By means of using keywords and electronic media database to collect research data.
 Results:
1. In 2014, there were 3,546 deaths by suicide in Taiwan; the suicide rate of male is higher than that of female. In addition, the suicide rate increased along with ages. 2. In Taiwan, there are around 1.245 million people suffering from emotional problems, and 13.2% of them had attempted suicide. 3. There are over 60 organizations in Taiwan engaging in suicide prevention together with mental health promotion. To remind the public to be aware of their and other’s own emotions, and to face it in positive attitude. 4. The suicide rate in Taiwan has been gradually decreasing since 2007, and it dropped out from the top ten leading causes of death in Taiwan for five years in a row since 2010.
 Conclusions:
1. Depression has a high correlation with suicidal behaviors. 2. To promote the public to consider suicide prevention as a basic knowledge.


(343) PO-343. Connecting with the suicidal mind. Finding the right words in crisis calls.

Day: 09 | Time: 10:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Testing the effectiveness of prevention strategies

Authors:Nanouschka Verhamme . ,
- Ekke Muijzers -

 Introduction:
Started in 1979 with a suicide prevention helpline, the Flemish Centre for Suicide Prevention gained solid experience handling crisis calls. Each year the centre answers thousands of crisis calls from individuals considering suicide. Reaching a state of calmness and installing safety can be challenging in these calls with high suicidal intent. Key is to balance between showing empathy and compassion on the one hand and addressing the reasons for living on the other. In crisis calls this is often walking a fine line.
 Goals:
Based on literature and experience, a model has been established in order to train volunteers in answering crisis calls.
 Results:
The model, involving the importance of basic attitudes, risk assessment, the meaning and ambivalence of the suicide, reasons for living and coping will briefly be discussed. By use of fictional transcripts it will be illustrated how to connect to the suicidal ‘mindset’. It will be shown how crisis conversations with seemingly little perspective can be approached by using the right words to find the right tone of voice.
 Conclusions:
Focus lays on small instructions to gain more confidence in handling crisis conversations.


(377) PO-377. Analysis of the role of bullying as a suicide risk factor

Day: 09 | Time: 10:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Testing the effectiveness of prevention strategies

Authors:Nuria Machin . Skylark Health Research Ltd, Halesworth - United Kingdom
-

 Introduction:
The aim of this study is to present an analysis of the role of bullying as a suicide risk factor, based on the data obtained from results from an EC Funded Project (SUPREME) which included suicide prevention intervention studies in Estonia, Italy, Hungary, Lithuania, Spain, Sweden and UK
 Goals:
To explore the Supreme dataset obtained from the SUPREME European partners respondents involved in bullying as a victim and as an aggressor, -To analyse the cross sectional data and to use the longitudinal data to explore the impact of the Supreme intervention of those being bullied / those who bully
 Methodology:
A randomised controlled trial was designed to test a web-based suicide prevention intervention which communicated information and sources of support. The intervention was conducted over six months ending in 2013. A questionnaire was designed to identify suicidal ideation, anxiety, stress and depression levels, (DASS-42) and Paykel Suicide Scale. Data from all countries’ participants (n=2286) from the baseline database, and (n=1575) from the longitudinal study database was collected to examine relationships based on sociodemographic characteristics , risky behaviours (drugs, substance abuse, involvement in bullying )and internet use
 Results:
Preliminary findings suggest adolescents who and those who are bullied or bully others are at an increased risk of suffering mental health problems and suicidal ideation in most countries. study has been used to investigate associations between bullying, being bullied and other risk factors associated with suicidal behaviour. Adolescents who are being bullied are at an increased risk of feelings of depression, anxiety and stress (p<0.001) and suicidal thoughts (p <0.001) and a high suicide risk in some countries
 Conclusions:
Preliminary results suggest consistency with research findings(1,2,3,). Adolescents who are involved in bullying are at a heightened risk of suicide. The role of depression is also discussed, as a mediator as some studies (4) show stress indicates strong association as a mediator between bullying/victimization and suicide attempts, but differently for males and females
 References:
(1) Espelage DL, Holt MK, Suicidal Ideation and School Bullying Experiences After Controlling for Depression and Deliquency, Journal of Adolescent Health, Journal of Adolescent Health 53 (2013) S27eS31 (2)Borowsky IW et al, Suicidal Thinking and Behavior Among Youth Involved in Verbal and Social Bullying: Risk and Protective Factors, Journal of Adolescent Health 53 (2013) S4eS12, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2012.10.280 (3) Bauman S1, Toomey RB, Walker JL.Associations among bullying, cyberbulling and suicide in high school students, Journal of Adolescence2013 Apr;36(2):341-50. doi: 10.1016/j.adolescence.2012.12.001. Epub 2013 Jan 16.