Poster Index

Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Clinical and neurocognitive studies of suicidal behavior (17)  |  Clinical phenotyping of suicidal individuals (23)
Culture, ethnicity and spiritual approaches. New paradigms in suicidology (11)  |  Ethical and methodological challenges and solutions in suicide research (5)
Genetic, epigenetic and gene expression contributors to suicide risk (2)  |  Intervention research for prevention of suicidal behavior (30)
Lifespan differential aspects (from infancy to elderly) (7)  |  Miscellany (assisted suicide, minorities, legal aspects, etc.) (9)
Neurobiological underpinnings of suicidal behavior (3)  |  Novel monitoring strategies for detecting changes in risk over time (4)
Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability (38)  |  Testing the effectiveness of prevention strategies (6)




Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability


(27) PO-27. Suicide reporting in the NZ news media: Impact of releasing information on methods

Day: 09 | Time: 10:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Sunny Collings . University of Otago, New Zealand
- Ben Slim - James Stanley - Gabrielle Jenkin -

 Introduction:

Aim: In August 2010 the Chief Coroner released to the press, suicide statistics including details of the methods used. This was a high profile and controversial action contradicting best practice media guidelines on suicide reporting. We aimed to see if this action had an impact on the nature and extent of suicide reporting in the New Zealand newsprint media.
Method: The Factiva database was searched for news items on cases of suicide before and after the Chief Coroner?s action. The news items were counted and the nature of suicide reporting assessed by examining the frequency at which key variables were reported.
Results: There were fewer reports of individual cases of suicide in the year after the Chief Coroner?s action (n=62) than before (n=94) and this difference was statistically significant. Considered relative to the number of suicides occurring in these periods this represented a 28% reduction in the rate of reporting of suicide per actual death. Due to the small number of cases in each period no major conclusions could be drawn about any changes to the nature of suicide reporting.
Conclusion: The Chief Coroner's actions appear to have done no harm and in fact the frequency of suicide reporting in the New Zealand newsprint media declined.


(111) PO-111. Suicide in the over 60s in Northern Ireland

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Siobhan Oneill . Ulster University, Londonderry
-

 Introduction:
Northern Ireland (NI) currently has the highest rate of suicide in the British Isles and the suicide death rate for those aged over 60 years has shown a consistent increase over the past 10 years.
 Methodology:
This paper presents and analysis of over 1600 suicides in NI; 165 of whom were individuals aged over 60 years (51 women and 142 men). The data is based on the information contained within coronial files on deaths with a verdict of suicide and also cases where the cause of death is undetermined, but is likely to be suicide. The sources of evidence include police records, witness statements at the time of the death and medical and toxicology reports.
 Results:
The over 60 age group were less likely to have died by hanging than the other groups and less likely to have taken alcohol at the time of death. The over 60 age group were also less likely than the other age groups to have had prior attempts or communications regarding suicide. A thematic analysis of the personal circumstances and life events prior to death revealed that in addition to recorded mental illness, concerns about transitions in care, death or illness of a loved one and physical health conditions or concerns were common.
 Conclusions:
The results are discussed in the context of the theories of suicide and the implications for the care and treatment of older people with mental and physical illnesses are elucidated. The findings raise questions about the effects of the current societal debates about assisted dying and how we can foster connectedness and reduce burdensomeness in this group.


(116) PO-116. Resiliency to suicide ideation and behavior: The relative importance of various protective factors

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Paula Siegmann . Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum, Germany
- Tobias Teismann - Jürgen Margraf -

 Introduction:
Worldwide about one million people die by suicide each year. While substantial efforts have been made to understand which risk factors contribute to suicide ideation and suicidal behavior, far less attention has been paid to factors that buffer individuals against the development of suicide ideation and behavior.
 Goals:
The present study investigated resilience factors associated with suicide ideation and attempts in a sample of German students.
 Methodology:
A total of 601 students (68 % female; age: 18 - 52 years) were assessed. Social support, satisfaction with life, resilience, self-efficacy and positive mental health were considered as predictors of suicide ideation and suicide attempts ? controlling for gender, age and symptom severity.
 Results:
21 % of the students reported suicide ideation in the last 12 month and 4.3 % reported lifetime suicide attempts. Social support and positive mental health emerged as predictors of lowered suicide ideation. Social support, satisfaction with life and self-efficacy were predictive of less lifetime suicide attempts ? controlling for age, gender and symptom severity in both analyses.
 Conclusions:
Various factors seem to buffer against suicide ideation and suicide attempts. As in previous studies, social support emerged as a protective factor of special relevance. In terms of clinical implications, these findings suggest that protective factors should be a key consideration when assessing clients? risk of suicide, as these factors may attenuate the influence of risk factors.


(127) PO-127. Psychosocial disability after suicide attempts

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Manuel Canal-Rivero . Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona/ Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla- Spain
- Jordi E Obiols Llandrich - Miguel Ruiz Veguilla -

 Introduction:
The adverse impact of attempts of suicide on psychosocial functioning and symptomatic remission hasn´t been well documented. However, the determinants and levels of psychosocial functioning and symptomatic remission remain poorly understood in people experiencing FEP. This study aimed to study the effects of attempts of suicide after first episode of psychosis on psychosocial functioning and symptomatic remission one year after first episode of psychosis.
 Goals:
The aim of this stusy is analyze the effects of suicide attempts on psychosocial functioning
 Methodology:
Sixty-five first-episode patients participated in this study. Baseline demographic clinical data and information about suicide attempts previous at FEP were collected in the first contact with mental health services. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected from information provided by the patients and their relatives. We used Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) to screen for psychotic symptoms which were then used for diagnosis. Information about suicide attempts previous at FEP was collected using Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychyatry SCAN. This clinical interview contains a question about attempted suicide. At 12 months after first episode of psychosis WHO-DAS-S was used to assess psychosocial functioning. Is a semi-structured interview to screen psychosocial functioning in four dimensions: personal care, occupation, family and household and broader social context. This interview is recommended by OMS to evaluate difficulties caused for physical and mental problems. We defined remission according to PANSS operational criteria set up by the Remission in Schizophrenia Working Group. The symptomatic criterion includes eight core PANSS items (delusion, unusual thought content, hallucinatory behaviour, conceptual disorganization, mannerism/posturing, blunted affect, social withdrawal, lack of spontaneity) with a score ? 3.The duration criterion is symptomatic remission maintenance over 6 consecutive months.
 Results:
Significant correlation (P<0.001) was found between disability in personal care and number of attempts of suicide after first episode of psychosis (r=0.52). Disability in family and household correlated significantly (P<0.005) with number of attempts after first episode of psychosis (r=0.29). Multivariable analysis were done to analyse the relationship between disability in personal care and family and household with number of attempts of suicide. In the linear regression we included covariates. These covariates were: age, gender and diagnosis. Number of attempts of suicide explaining 20% of the variance in the disability of personal care and 14% of the variance in the disability of family and household.
 Conclusions:
Suicide attempts impacted negatively on personal care and family and household disability. These findings have significant implications for early, targeted interventions for this vulnerable group.
 References:
1. Evert H, Harvey C, Trauer T, Herrman H. The relationship between social networks and occupational and self-care functioning in people with psychosis. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2003;38(4):180?8.
2. Marwaha S, Johnson S. Schizophrenia and employment - a review. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol [Internet]. 2004;39(5):337?49. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15133589
3. Jaracz K, Górna K, Kiejda J, Grabowska-Fudala B, Jaracz J, Suwalska A, et al. Psychosocial functioning in relation to symptomatic remission: A longitudinal study of first episode schizophrenia. Eur Psychiatry [Internet]. 2015 Nov [cited 2016 Jan 14];30(8):907?13. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924933815001479


(131) PO-131. Suicide and sociodemographic factors

Day: 09 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Esther Torío . Mental Health Services. SESPA Area IV. , Oviedo, Spain.
- Javier Caballer - Marino Montes - Inmaculada Serrano - Pilar Saiz - Julio Bobes - Luis Jiménez-Treviño -

 Introduction:
Many factors have been analyzed in relation to suicide: biological, genetic, mental disorders, or sociodemographic factors1. Of the above mentioned, different hypothesis exist about the relation between suicide rates and sociodemographic factors such as sex, age, education, income, unemployment, even latitude is directly related to variation in suicide rates2.
 Goals:
To realize an analysis of sociodemographic factors related to suicide from a global perspective and provide information to improve suicide prevention strategies.
 Methodology:
Departing from official databases (WHO, World Bank, US Government) of every country, we analyze the relation between the different variables and suicide rates. Analysis of correlation and linear regression has been used with the statistical program SPSS v15.0.
 Results:
A positive correlation (Pearson) exists between suicide rates and: mean age (Pearson: 0,414 P=0,002), alcohol consumption (Pearson: 0,669 P=0,000) and latitude (Pearson:0,512 P=0,000). Suicide rates increase with age, alcohol consumption and latitude of the country.
There is no significant correlation between suicide rates and socioeconomic level (Pearson:-0.006 P=0,963). In the later linear regression analysis, only alcohol consumption is a predictor variable with a suicide rate increase of 1.637 for every liter of alcohol per capita (Anova P=0,000).
As for the correlation between suicide rates and religion, the result is not statistically significant (Anova P=0,090).
 Conclusions:
The results of the study indicate that exists a relation between the suicide rates and sociodemographic factors such as age, latitude, and consumption of alcohol, but not with socioeconomic level of countries
Alcohol consumption, in addition, predicts an increase in suicide risk.
There seems to be a trend so that Muslim countries have lower suicide rates than non- religious countries.
 References:
1.García Resa E, Braquehais D, Blasco H, Ramírez A, Jiménez L, Díaz-Sastre C, Baca-García E, Sáiz J. Aspectos sociodemográficos de los intentos de suicidio. Actas Esp Psiquiatr 2002; 30 (2): 112-119.
2.Prevalence and risk factors for suicide ideation, plans and attempts in the WHO. World Mental Health Surveys. J Clin Psychiatry 2010; 71 (12): 1617-1628


(132) PO-132. Risk factors for smoking in European adolescents: Results of the SEYLE study

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Christian Haring . State Hospital Hall in Tyrol/tirol-kliniken, Hall, Austria
-

 Introduction:
AIMS: Tobacco smoking among adolescents is still a major public health problem and a global concern. Early onset and long-term smoking are associated with physical and psychological health problems. The aim of the presented analysis was to investigate risk and influencing factors for occasional and daily cigarette smoking in European adolescents.
METHODS: In the context of the Europe-wide ?Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe? (SEYLE) study we surveyed 12,328 adolescents at the age of 13 to 17 from eleven countries. The survey took place in a school-based context using a questionnaire. Questions from the Global School-Based Student Health Survey (GSHS) were applied to determine nicotine consumption and other risk behaviors like substance consumption and family problems. Behavioral criteria like conduct problems, and hyperactivity as well as emotional symptoms were investigated using the Strenghts and Difficulties Questionaire (SDQ). Psychological issues like suicidal behavior, direct self-injurious behavior and anxiety were ascertained using the Paykel Suicide Scale (PSS), a shortened version of the Deliberate Self-Harm Inventory (DSHI) and the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), respectively.
RESULTS: On average 30.9% of adolescents reported daily smoking and 58% reported the onset of smoking under the age of 14 already. Multinomial logistic regression model showed significant correlations between adolescent smoking and psychological issues (anxiety, emotional symptoms, previous suicide attempts, D-SIB), family problems (parental smoking, family drunkenness, living in single parent households), behavioral criteria (conduct problems, hyperactivity) and substance consumption (excessive alcohol use, illegal drug use).
CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that adolescent smoking is associated with psychiatric problems as well as behavioral criteria and substance use. Further, smoking and psychosocial factors, especially family setting and parental behaviors, are highly correlated. Therefore, early preventive measures are necessary and essential not only for adolescents but also for their parents.


(141) PO-141. Suicide in the Workplace: Impact, Experiences and Responses of Colleagues

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Evelyn Gordon . Dublin City University, Dublin Ireland
- Briege Casey -

 Introduction:
The impact of suicide is far reaching. There is a growing body of theoretical and research literature regarding the experiences and needs of those bereaved by suicide, indicating that bereavement by suicide entails some unique features (Hunt & Hertlein 2015); hence the response needs to be tailored to meet these needs (Gordon et al., 2015). The prevalence of suicide in the workplace is increasing worldwide (Cullen 2014) and while awareness concerning incidence, possible contributing factors and the effectiveness of prevention strategies is developing, little is known about the lived experience of workplace suicide for mangers and co-workers. Suicide in the workplace can evoke powerful emotional responses among colleagues such as anger, fear and distress (Kinder & Cooper 2009) yet this is a vastly under researched area.
 Methodology:
This paper describes the findings of a study, which used an Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) method, to explore the experiences and responses of workplace colleagues - managers and co-workers.
 Conclusions:
The impact of worker suicide on the organisation as a whole will also be discussed.
 References:
Cullen J. G. (2014) Towards an organisational suicidology, Culture and Organization, 20:1, 40-52
Gordon, E., McElvaney, R., MacGabhann, L., Farrelly, M., Casey, B. & Pulcherio, I. (2015) Responding to the Suicide Bereaved: The Mayo model ? Full Report, Dublin: Dublin City University.

Kinder A. & Cooper C. L. (2009) The Costs of Suicide and Sudden Death Within an Organization, Death Studies, 33:5, 411-419
Hunt Q. A. & Hertlein K. M. (2015) Conceptualizing Suicide Bereavement From an Attachment Lens, The American Journal of Family Therapy, 43:1, 16-27,


(144) PO-144. Trends in suicidal behaviour in Dutch general practice 1983-2013: A retrospective observational study

Day: 09 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Derek De Beurs . Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL), Amsterdam The Neterlands
-

 Introduction:
Objectives:

To analyze trends in suicidal behaviour as reported by Dutch sentinel general practices from 1983-2013. Second, to examine the relationship between suicidal behaviour and several patient characteristics. Finally, to compare the relationship between suicidal behaviour and patient characteristics before (1983-2007) and after (2008-2013) the start of the crisis.

Setting
40 general practices in the Netherlands during the period 1983-2013

Participants

Patients with an ICPC code of P77 (suicide attempt)


Primary and secondary outcomes


Primary outcomes were age-adjusted and gender-specific trends in reported suicides (342) and suicide attempts (1614). Secondary outcomes were the relationship between suicidal behaviour and age, household composition, history of depression, recognition of suicide ideation, treatment before the suicidal behaviour and contact within the last month before suicidal behaviour for the period 1983-2013. Additionally, separate frequencies for the periods 1983-2007 and 2008-2013 were presented.


Results

Join-point analyses revealed a significant rise in male suicides from 2008 (b = 0.32, SE = 0.1, p = 0.008), and an increase in male suicide attempts since 2009 (b = 0.19, SE = 0.04, P < 0.001). Female suicidal behaviour showed a steady decrease from 1989-2013(b = -0.03, SE = 0.007, p < 0.0001 for female suicide, b = -0.02, SE = 0.002, p < 0.001 for female attempts). Before 2007, a history of depression was reported in 65% (168/257) of the suicides. After the start of the recession, a depression was recognized in 44% (22/50) of the patients that died by suicide.




Conclusions

Since 2008, there was a rise in the male suicide rate while female suicide behaviour has continued to decline. GPs less often reported a history of depression within patients that died due to suicide after 2007 than before. Training in the early recognition of suicide ideation in depressive patients might improve suicide prevention in primary care.


(150) PO-150. The area of residence influences female suicide

Day: 09 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Jon García Ormaza . SERVICIO VASCO DE SALUD, BARAKALDO (VIZCAYA)
- Marta Diez Gabas - Aníbal Arrillaga Trueba - Aida Sánchez Palacio - Iñaki Eguiluz Uruchurtu - Rafael Segarra Echebarria -

 Introduction:
Suicide is responsible for at least one million deaths annually in the world. Suicide is the result of the complex interaction of multiple factors, which include psychiatric and medical aspects and genetic and environmental factors. No factor has been shown necessary nor sufficient, or what is the same, suicide never occurs in response to a single cause. Epidemiologically, individual factors are not sufficient to explain the risk of suicide, making it necessary to take into account contextual factors of the area of residence.
 Goals:
Analyze the distribution of suicides based on the residence of the deceased in Districts of unequal socioeconomic level in Barakaldo, Spanish city of 100,000 inhabitants.
 Methodology:
The study includes 31 cases of suicide recognized by the Basque Institute of Legal Medicine during the period from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2014. To ensure an objective approach to poverty, socio-economic deprivation indicator MEDEA (acronym for Mortality in Spanish small areas and Socioeconomic and Environmental Inequalities) was used. MEDEA is constructed from the analysis of five economic indicators: unemployment, inadequate education, insufficient instruction in youth, manual workers and temporary employees. This indicator distinguishes five quintiles, representing Q1 the lowest, and Q5 the highest level of deprivation.
 Results:
Differences among suicide rates of nine different districts are not statistically significant (p=0,680), but all cases of female suicide occurred in the most disadvantaged neighborhoods (those districts represented Q4 and Q5).
 Conclusions:
Since our results show an excess of female suicide in the economically depressed areas, we suggest implementing specific suicide prevention programs in these disadvantaged neighborhoods.
 References:
Ministerio de Fomento. Análisis Urbanístico de Barrios Vulnerables: Barakaldo. Madrid: Gobierno de España; 2010.

Distribución del índice de privación socioeconómica en las secciones censales de la CAPV. Euskadi: Osakidetza-Servicio Vasco de Salud; 2013. Available from: http://www.osakidetza.euskadi.eus/


(162) PO-162. Violent relationships and self-harm among young adolescents in Denmark

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Sarah Jensen . Centre for Suicide Research, Odense - Denmark
- Anne Clausen -

 Introduction:
This study is part of the on-going project called The CASE Study (Childhood and Adolescent Self-harm in Europe). The study examines the prevalence of vulnerability, self-harm, and suicidal behaviour among adolescents aged 13-19 years in Denmark. Furthermore, factors that decrease or increase the risk of self-harm and suicidal behaviour are identified.
 Goals:
The goal is to raise awareness of violent teenage relationships and how much it affects adolescents. With this information preventive actions can be taken.
 Methodology:
Data is collected through a questionnaire administered to schools in Denmark. The questionnaire is web-based and includes 42 questions in 2015. Seven questions concern violence (psychologically, physically or sexually). Calculations were done by multiple regression analysis to control for gender, age and household differences.
 Results:
In total, 4,721 adolescents aged 13-19 years from 52 different schools completed the questionnaire.
2775 adolescents (59%) had experienced at least one kind of violence, whereof most had experienced psychological violence. 133 of these adolescents (5%) had experienced violence from a partner during or after a relationship. Results showed that adolescents who experienced violence from other people than their partner nearly had a 5 times higher risk of carrying out self-harm than those who had not experienced violence (OR 4.5 p<0.0001). Meanwhile, adolescents who experienced violence from a partner had a 9 times higher risk of carrying out self-harm than those who had not experienced violence (OR 8.8 p<0.0001).

 Conclusions:
Violence from a partner is far more damaging than violence from other people like family, friends, or strangers.


(168) PO-168. Hospitalization in suicidal behavior

Day: 09 | Time: 10:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Antonio España Osuna . Complejo Hospitalario de Jaen, Jaen
- Mercedes Valverde Barea - Francisca Cartas Moreno -

 Introduction:
There are varied reasons for admission in Mental Health Hospitalization Units. Among them, there are of great importance both self-injurious thoughts and attempts suicide by their great impact on society. In recent decades, the suicide rate has increased coming to be among the leading causes of death worldwide, so establishing the relationship between the different stressors to which people are exposed and the appearance of self-injurious ideas is very important to establish possible risk factors as protectors and thus be able to better prevention of suicidal behaviors.


 Goals:
The aim is to analyze the prevalence over a year of patients requiring hospitalization for self-injurious thoughts and self-injurious gestures to total revenue in the mental health unit, as well as different socio-demographic factors that may be related to his appearance.
 Methodology:
Descriptive study, with a sample of 134 patients who required hospitalization in Mental Health Hospitalization Units.
Collected socio-demographic variables: sex, age, marital status and reason for admission.
 Results:
We obtain a sample of 134. From all of them 72 are men and 62 women. The average age of the sample stands at 44 years for those with self-harm ideation and 42 years for suicide attempts. We have a population ranging from 19 years to 83 years. Considering the re-entries of autolytic ideation and suicide attempts, the most frequency of occurrence are in the age group of 36-50 years and most are married.
 Conclusions:
Autolytic revenue ideation and suicide attempts are of great importance in our population, reaching a fifth of total revenue. The number is being greater in males. As autolytic ideation, most cases are female
The average age of life is the stage where most self-injurious ideation and suicide attempts are situated.
Considering marital status, we have observed that married situation can be considered a risk factor for suicide.
 References:
Kim JL, Kim JM, Choi Y, Lee TH, Park EC. Effect of Socioeconomic Status on the Linkage Between Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempts. Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2016 Mar 17.

Wierzbi?ski P, Ka?mierczak W, Zdanowicz A, Zboralski K. Causes of suicide attempts in patients undergoing psychiatric hospitalization--a preliminary study. Pol Merkur Lekarski. 2015 Oct; 39 (232):209-13.


(170) PO-170. Dual pathology and suicide

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Antonio España Osuna . Complejo Hospitalario de Jaen, Jaen
- Mercedes Valverde Barea - Francisca Cartas Moreno -

 Introduction:
The so-called "drunkorexia", anorexia and alcoholism, is increasing among young people. When you join an addiction in a patient with eating disorder increases the risk of suicide. a case where, in addition, consumption was both members of the couple with what the chances of relapse are higher exposed.

 Goals:
Provide an example of autolytic complication in a box dual pathology.
 Methodology:
Reason for consultation: alcohol abuse, and autolytic hyporexia gesture with a knife.
Current disease: The patient injured herself in the abdomen with a knife after worsen their mood by family and labor problems in the context of excessive alcohol consumption and continued a couple. Access to voluntary admission.
Personal history: Gastralgia by NSAIDS. alcohol abuse.
Family history: Grandfather maternal alcoholism and suicide by hanging. Two maternal aunts suffer from depression.
Psychopathological exploration: extreme thinness (BMI: 15.8495 kg / m2). Conscious, alert and oriented. Euthymic without current autolytic ideation. Body image distortion with partial criticism. Decreased appetite. Dream preserved. Recognizes alcohol abuse, along with her husband.
Investigations:
Blood tests and urine normocytic anemia. Slight decrease glucose, albumin and cholesterol. Slight increase in GGT and VSG. No electrolyte disturbances. Triage to negative toxic.
Abdominal ultrasound: intravesical polyp 3 mm.
Hamilton Depression Scale: score below the cutoff for depression.
Diagnostics: ICD-10: F50.0 Anorexia nervosa restrictive purgative mixed type. F10.1 harmful alcohol consumption.
Treatment: Mirtazapine 30 mg: 0-0-1, diazepam 5 mg: 1-1-0, B1B6B12: 1-1-1, folic acid 5 mg: 1-0-0.
 Results:
The patient had an adequate response to hospitalization and establishment of antidepressant, anxiolytic and multivitamin treatment and prevention of abstinence and relapse of alcohol consumption.
 Conclusions:
1. Consumption of toxic worsens any Axis I psychiatric disorder and makes it more difficult to control. It also increases the risk of suicide.
2. The withdrawal of toxic, nutritional recovery, family intervention and drug therapy are the mainstay of treatment.
 References:
Cucchi A, Ryan D, Konstantakopoulos G, Stroumpa S, Kaçar A?, Renshaw S, Landau S, Kravariti E. Lifetime prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury in patients with eating disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Psychol Med. 2016 Mar 8:1-14

Eisenberg MH, Fitz CC." Drunkorexia": exploring the who and why of a disturbing trend in college students eating and drinking behaviors. J Am Coll Health. 2014; 62 (8):570-7.


(185) PO-185. Suicide in Taiwan 1905-1940 and 1959-2012: A time trend analysis

Day: 09 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Shu-sen Chang . National Taiwan University, Taiwan
- Yi-han Chang -

 Introduction:
Previous studies of long-term trends in suicide are restricted to Western countries.
 Goals:
To investigate trends in suicide in Taiwan during the Japanese colonial period (1905-1940) and the post-war period (1959-2012).
 Methodology:
Data for suicide were obtained from the Statistical Reports of Taiwan Governor’s Office (1905-1940), Vital Statistics (1959-1970) and computerized cause-of-death mortality files (1971-2012). Annual sex-, age-, and method-specific suicide rates were calculated. We examined Pearson’s correlation between suicide and economic indicators using de-trended data (year-on-year differences).
 Results:
In 1905-1940, male suicide rates of all age groups increased, whilst young and older females showed divergent trends, with females aged 20-29 years showing a more than 50% reduction and those aged 50+ years showing a more than two-fold increase in rates. In 1959-2012, male and female rates showed generally similar trends whilst there were two to six-fold differences in age-specific rates over time. Male-to-female rate ratio increased markedly in those aged below 40; for example, in 20-29-year-olds, it increased from 0.5 in 1905 to 1.6 in 2012, indicating a reverse in sex pattern. Hanging was the major method for suicide in 1905-1940, whilst poisoning became the most common method in the early part of the post-war period until it was replaced by hanging in the 1990s. The use of gassing for suicide increased markedly in the 2000s and a smaller increase was seen for suicide by drowning and falling from the 1990s. Economic downturns were correlated with a rise in suicide, particularly in men – in 1905-1940 male suicide rate was inversely correlated with GDP growth (r=-0.36, p=0.035) and in 1959-2012 it was positively correlated with unemployment rate (r=0.50, p=0.0001).
 Conclusions:
Suicide trends and patterns changed markedly in Taiwan over the past 100 years. Suicide rates rose with economic downturns and increased unemployment rates. Our findings contribute to suicide prevention strategies.


(205) PO-205. Relapse risk factors for suicide attempts in adolescents

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Francisco Villar Cabeza . Servicio de Psiquiatría y Psicología del Hospital Materno-Infantil Sant Joan de Déu, Esplugues de Llobregat (Barcelona), España
- Carmina Castellano-Tejedor - Bernardo Sánchez Fernández - Tomás Blasco Blasco -

 Introduction:
Every year, suicide claims the lives of tens of thousands of young people worldwide. Prior suicide-related behaviors are an important indicator of current risk[1]. Despite its high prevalence, suicidality in high risk samples is still undetected in many cases. Therefore, early identification of suicide risk factors may be an important method of mitigating this public health crisis[2].
 Goals:
To analyze risk factors for suicide attempt relapse in a sample of adolescents with previous suicide related behaviors.
 Methodology:
The total sample consisted of 526 suicidal attempts in a sample of 402 adolescents age between 8 and 17 years of age (M=14.76, SD=1.56). Variables considered for the analysis were: gender, age, current comorbidity, previous psychopathological disorders, previous suicide-related behaviors and family previous suicide-related behaviors. Data was collected by the attending clinical psychologist. Longitudinal design with logistical regression models, Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used.
 Results:
A significant logistic regression model was obtained (2(3, N=402)=25.317; p<.001)) including gender (OR=.285, p=.045, IC95%=.084-.971), age (OR=.389, p=.023, IC95%=.172-.879) and comorbidity (OR=.267, p<.001, IC95%=.137-.521).
 Conclusions:
Females under 16 years old with comorbidity are at greater risk of committing successive suicide attempts after an episode. Targeted suicide screening may be the most effective way to recognize and prevent suicide-related behaviors in high risk samples. Thus, more research is needed to increase the knowledge on empirically based risk factors to design accurate suicide prevention protocols or early intervention plans.
 References:
[1] Miranda R, Scott M, Hicks R, Wilcox HC, Harris-Munfakh JL & Shaffer D. Suicide attempt characteristics, diagnoses, and future attempts: Comparing multiple attempters to single attempters and ideators. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 2008;47(1):32–40. [2] Instituto Nacional de estadística. Defunciones según la causa de muerte en 2013. Available at: www.ine.es


(226) PO-226. Prevalence and factors associated with suicidality: A longitudinal study in a nationally representative sample from Spain

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Kaloyan Kamenov . Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental. CIBERSAM, Madrid-Spain
- Francisco Félix Caballero - Marta Miret - Marco Bennardi - María Cabello - Beatriz Olaya - Josep María Haro - Ella Arensman - José Luis Ayuso-Mateos -

 Introduction:
It is still unknown whether the rates of suicidal ideation and attempts have changed after the 2012 healthcare and social expenditure cuts in Spain (1). Furthermore, to date no longitudinal studies have been carried out in nationally representative samples of the general population in Spain to analyse the prevalence trends and factors longitudinally associated with suicidality.
 Goals:
To estimate the prevalence of non-fatal suicidal behaviour in Spain and to analyse potential factors longitudinally associated with suicidal ideation in the previous 12 months.
 Methodology:
A nationally representative sample of non-institutionalised adults (n=4375) was interviewed in Spain within the COURAGE in Europe project in 2011-2012. The present study was focused on 2528 participants who were re-evaluated in 2014-2015. The presence of suicidal ideation, suicide planning and attempts in the previous 12 months was evaluated using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Socio-demographics, socio-economic variables, tobacco and alcohol consumption, physical activity, obesity, loneliness, affect, depression and disability at baseline were considered as potential factors related to suicidal ideation. A logistic regression model with a penalised likelihood method was employed. Rates were calculated using the direct method of age standardisation to the 2010 European Standard Population.
 Results:
The prevalence estimates of 12-month outcomes in the follow-up were 1.41% for suicidal ideation, 0.23% for suicide planning, and 0.11% for suicide attempt. After controlling for suicidal ideation at baseline, heavy alcohol consumption (OR=4.92, p=0.027), depression (OR=3.04, p=0.027) and low positive affect (OR=0.64, p=0.005) were significantly associated with suicidal ideation in the previous 12 months.
 Conclusions:
Compared to results from 2011-2012, there was a slight but not statistically significant increase in suicidal ideation and no increase in suicidal planning (2). Suicide prevention programmes should focus on early detection, prevention of depression and heavy drinking, and improved care of those affected.
 References:
1. Legido-Quigley H, Otero L, la Parra D, Alvarez-Dardet C, Martin-Moreno JM, McKee M. Will austerity cuts dismantle the Spanish healthcare system?. Bmj. 2013 Jun 13;346. 2. Miret M, Caballero FF, Huerta-Ramírez R, Moneta MV, Olaya B, Chatterji S, Haro JM, Ayuso-Mateos JL. Factors associated with suicidal ideation and attempts in Spain for different age groups. Prevalence before and after the onset of the economic crisis. Journal of affective disorders. 2014 Jul 31;163:1-9.


(233) PO-233. Self-reported sucidal ideation in Latvia: Associations with gender, age and self-rated health

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Santa Japenina . Centre for Disease Prevention and Control of Latvia, Riga, Latvia
- Toms Pulmanis - Lauma Springe - Biruta Velika - Iveta Pudule - Daiga Grinberga - Iveta Gavare -

 Introduction:
Suicide rate in Latvian population is the 3rd highest among the Member States of the EU (1, 2). Suicide is a complex process that involves series of mechanisms from initiation of ideation, to planning, and finally, to attempting suicide (3, 4). Suicidal ideation is often associated with the risk of completed suicide (4, 5, 6).
 Goals:
To determine the last year prevalence of self-reported suicidal ideation in Latvian 15-64 year old population and associations between suicidal ideation, age, gender and self-rated health.
 Methodology:
Data from Health Behaviour among Latvian Adult Population survey (2014) with nationally representative sample of 15 – 64 year old respondents (n=3010) were analysed. Adjusted regression model with self-reported suicidal ideation in last 12 months as dependent variable and gender, age and self-rated health as factor variables was performed. Statistical significance was based on 95% confidence intervals.
 Results:
3.1% (95% CI=2.5-3.7) of respondents reported suicidal ideation in the last 12 months. Those who reported poor self-rated health had 11 times higher odds (OR=11.3 95% CI=6.0-21.2) of suicidal ideation in the last 12 months compared with those who rated their health as good after adjusting for age and gender. 15-34 year old respondents had two times higher odds (OR=2.0 95%CI=1.1-3.8) of suicidal ideation in the last 12 months compared with 55-64 year olds respondents after adjusting for other variables in the model.
 Conclusions:
Younger respondents and those with poor self-rated health had higher odds of suicidal ideation. Further research is needed to identify additional risk factors for suicidal ideation and other forms of suicidal behaviour in Latvia.
 References:
1. World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. European Detailed Mortality database; 2014 (updated December 2015; cited February 2016). Available from: http://data.euro.who.int/dmdb/ 2. Paykel ES, Myers JK, Lindenthal JJ, Tanner J. Suicidal feelings in the general population: a prevalence study. Br J Psychiatry. 1974;124:460–469. 3. Mann JJ, Apter A, Bertolote J, Beautrais A, Currier D, Haas A, et al. Suicide prevention strategies: A systematic review. J Formos Med Assoc. 2005;294(16):2064-2074. 4. Casey PR, Dunn G, Kelly BD, Birkbeck G, Dalgard AS, Lehtinen V, et al. Factors associated with suicidal ideation in the general population: five-centre analysis from the ODIN study. Br J Psychiatry. 2006;189:410-415. 5. Lee JI, Lee MB, Liao SC, Chang CM, Sung SC, Chiang HC, et al. Prevalence of suicidal ideation and associated risk factors in the general population. J Formos Med Assoc. 2010;109(2):139. 6. Suominen K, Isometa E, Suokas J, Haukka J, Achte K, Lonnqvist J.. Completed suicide after a suicide attempt: a 37-year follow-up study. AM J Psychiatry 2004;161:562-563.


(252) PO-252. The effect of psychological resilience in buffering the impact of substance use on suicidal ideation in young adults.

Day: 09 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Patricia Gooding . University of Manchester, UK
-

 Introduction:
Introduction: Substance use is a considerable public health concern in young people. There are strong links between substance use and suicidal thoughts and behaviours in this population. This means that suicide prevention strategies should focus on factors which weaken this link. Psychological resilience describes mechanisms which buffer individuals from the consequences of negative events and stressors. Hence, building and nurturing psychological resilience is an important clinical target. The goal of the current study was to examine the extent to which psychological resilience would buffer young individuals from the effects of alcohol and drug use on suicidal thoughts. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire design was used. The outcome variable was suicidal ideation. Predictor variables were drug and alcohol use, and resilience was the moderator variable (total scores, and three sub-scale scores of emotional control, social support, and problem solving). Depression was controlled for in all analyses. An opportunity sample of young people from Manchester, UK, were recruited. Inclusion criteria were being over the age of 18 and under the age of 25, and being fluent in the English language. Results: Psychological resilience was protective in reducing the association between substance use and suicidal ideation. This is a particularly important result because levels of depression were controlled for in the analysis. Depression and substance use have been reported to be highly correlated, including in young people. This means that the positive effects of resilience factors on suicidal thoughts and behaviours were not due to lower depressive symptoms. Discussion: From a theoretical perspective, the components of inter-personal problem solving which confer resilience deserve further scrutiny in the context of developing psychological models of resilience to suicidality. Our findings have potentially important clinical implications for developing interventions which counter the amplifying interactions between substance use and suicidal thoughts and behaviours in young adults.


(255) PO-255. The effect of psychiatric symptoms in the pathways to suicidal thoughts and behaviour in psychiatric in-patients.

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Patricia Gooding . University of Manchester, UK
-

 Introduction:
Co-Authors:Awenat,Y., Davies,L., Emsley,R., Peters,S., Pratt,D., Haddock,G. Introduction: People who are psychiatric in-patients experience a range of severe mental illnesses. Consequently, they are at an increased risk of experiencing suicidal thoughts and/or behaviours. Contemporary psychological models of suicidality posit that defeat, entrapment, and hopelessness are key in the pathways to suicidality. Initial findings with suicidal prisoners point to an interactive role of psychiatric symptoms in such pathways. The goal of the current study was to build on this work, and to examine the ways in which psychiatric symptoms affect pathways to suicidility by affecting relationships between defeat, entrapment, hopelessness, and suicide probability. Method: This was a cross-sectional design. Participants were recruited from acute psychiatric wards from NHS trusts in the North West of England, UK, as part of a single blind randomised controlled trial with two arms, namely, treatment as usual (TAU) or cognitive therapy for suicide plus TAU. Inclusion criteria comprised being between the ages of 18-65 years, able to provide informed consent, having experienced suicidal thoughts or behaviours within the three months prior to admission, and having sufficient English language capacity to complete measures. A questionnaire battery included measures of suicide probability, hopelessness, defeat, entrapment, psychiatric symptoms, and depression. Mediation and moderated mediation analyses were applied to the data. Results: A mediation model was supported in which defeat led to suicide probability directly, and indirectly via entrapment, but not hopelessness. Furthermore, high levels of general psychiatric symptoms strengthened the relationship between defeat and suicide probability. However, entrapment was a predictor of suicide probability only when psychiatric symptom levels were low. Discussion and conclusions: These findings emphasise differential effects of defeat and entrapment on suicidality when considered in tandem with general psychiatric symptoms. Clinically, interventions to reduce perceptions of defeat and entrapment should consider interactive effects of psychiatric symptoms.


(257) PO-257. Factors which can contribute towards the potential for suicidal risk in young people

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Megan Gaffney . Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
- Dr. Paul Surgenor - Barbara Hannigan - Dr. Tim Trimble -

 Introduction:
Both national and international research have identified factors which can contribute towards the potential for suicidal risk in young people. Based on clinician experience and factors identified in the literature, a tool to measure both risk and resilience factors for suicidality in adolescents and young people was created.
 Goals:
The study aims to develop a practical tool for use in a variety of settings to identify adolescents and young people prior to or early on in the onset of a suicidal crisis.
 Methodology:
The Riskres tool, a 46-item self report scale was piloted initially with an ‘at risk’ population. 66 young people between the ages of 12 and 21 completed the Riskres as part of their assessment at a community based suicide and self harm service in Ireland. The participants also completed a brief screener for depression (PHQ-9) (Spitzer et al., 1999) and a brief standardised measure for suicidal behaviour (SBQ-R) (Osman et al., 2001). Demographic information was also collected. Test administrators were asked to log any queries about items from the participants for future refining of the language of items.
 Results:
Based on preliminary exploratory factor analysis, the Riskres tool looks at 15 factors: connection, hopelessness, impulsivity, anxiety, optimism, coping difficulties, isolation, self efficacy, worry, painful history, avoidance, school connection, sexuality, shame, and depression total. Also based on preliminary analysis, a binary logistic regression showed that the following 5 factors were significant in predicting one of the suicide ideation screening items. These factors are: hopelessness, anxiety, coping difficulties, school connection, and depression total.
 Conclusions:
Due to the relatively small sample size in the pilot study, further administration and validation with a larger sample is recommended, based on the provisional findings. The overall research aim is to develop a tool which is non-pathologising, strength identifying, and can guide intervention with young people.
 References:
Osman, A. C. L. Bagge, P. M. Gutierrez, L. C. Konick, B. A. Kopper, F. X. Barrios. The Suicidal Behaviors Questionnaire-Revised (SBQ-R): validation with clinical and nonclinical samples. Assessment. 2001 December; 8(4): 443–454. Spitzer, R.L. K. Kroenke, J. B. Williams. Validation and utility of a self-report version of PRIME-MD: the PHQ primary care study. Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders. Patient Health Questionnaire. JAMA. 1999 November 10; 282(18): 1737–1744.


(273) PO-273. Regional and Demographic Differences in Suicide Attempts

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Kathrine Aarøe Jørgensen . Centre for Suicide Research, Denmark
-

 Introduction:
The expansion of the Register for Suicide Attempts in Denmark has shown demographic differences nationwide. Data has been collected in several of the Danish regions from 2012-2014, and the distribution of suicide attempts differs significantly - both regarding the quantity of suicide attempts and the age.
 Goals:
The aim of the project is to approach an understanding of the link between regional differences on the one hand, and demographical patterns of suicide attempts on the other hand. Attention will especially be paid to the social relations in the local communities in order to explore whether there is a pattern that links the social relations with the geographic and demographic distribution of suicide attempts.
 Methodology:
By first mapping out geographical, social, and cultural features in the two Danish regions selected for the project, patterns in the suicide attempts are explored. With statistical data from the Register of Suicide Attempts, The CASE Study (Child and Adolescent Self-harm in Europe) and data containing information on health and social relations, the project examines whether there is a connection that can help explain the regional differences.
 Results:
Preliminary results indicate a connection between parameters such as distance from a bigger city, population density and age distribution on the one hand and rates of suicide attempts on the other hand. Furthermore, data from The CASE Study indicates that rates of suicide attempts among the younger population is lower in regions that report e.g. higher family support and lesser loneliness, which points to a connection between suicide attempts and social relations.
 Conclusions:
Comparison between two Danish regions indicates geographical differences in suicide attempts, but in order to conclude more thoroughly on the impact of the demographic and social parameters, further analysis is required.


(276) PO-276. How economic crisis influences suicidal behavior: A study in the province of Novara

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Debora Marangon . Department of Translational Medicine - University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara - Italy
- Carla Gramaglia - Isabella Coppola - Claudia Delicato - Sarah Di Marco - Eleonora Gattoni - Alessandra Venesia - Luigi Castello - Fabrizio Bert - Patrizia Zeppegno -

 Introduction:
Since 2009 in Europe, it was observed an increase in the suicide rates, which could be related with the economical crisis and the condition of unemployment. In accordance to Durkheim’s theory, the number of suicide attempts increases during periods of economic changes and decreases again when stability is achieved, due to the social integration in the community guaranteed by occupational status. Moreover unemployment is considered a risk factor for suicide, despite that it was observed an increase in suicide rates among Italian employed men during the last years, probably related to the specific economic scenario and to emerging difficulties in keeping an income to adequately maintain one’s own family standard of living
 Goals:
To examine the impact of Italian economical crisis on suicide behaviour, especially on suicide attempts, in the province of Novara.
 Methodology:
Patients aged>16 years admitted for psychiatric symptoms in the Emergency Room of the AOU Maggiore della Carità Hospital, Novara, Italy, were studied prospectively from 2008 to 2015. Each patient was assessed by an experienced psychiatrist with a clinical interview; socio-demographic and clinical features were gathered. Data were compare to socio-demographic characteristics of the general population in the province of Novara. Statistical significance was set at p≤0.05.
 Results:
The study describes the complex correlation among socio-demographic variables (especially socio-economic characteristics), psychiatric symptoms and suicide attempts. Preliminary results suggest an increase in suicide attempts according to the rise of the unemployment rate in Novara. Moreover we highlight that employment does not reflect the whole socio-economic situation, but considering other variables is necessary.
 Conclusions:
Data collection and statistical analyses are still ongoing. Implications for clinical practice will be discussed.
 References:
Wasserman D, Rihmer Z, Rujescu D, Sarchiapone M, Sokolowski M, Titelman D, Zalsman G, Zemishlany Z, Carli V, European Psychiatric Associaton: The European Psychiatric Association (EPA) guidance on suicide treatment and prevention. Eur Psychiatry (2012) 27:129-41. Zeppegno P, Gramaglia C, Castello LM, Bert F, Gualano MR, Ressico F, Coppola I, Avanzi GC, Siliquini R, Torre E. Suicide attempts and emergency room psychiatric consultation. BMC Psychiatry (2015) 15: 13.


(279) PO-279. ATTEMPTED SUICIDE AND DEPRESSION: ELECTRODERMAL ACTIVITY, RESILIENCE, COPING AND PERSONALITY TRAITS

Day: 09 | Time: 10:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Isabella Coppola . Department of Translational Medicine - University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara - Italy
- Carla Gramaglia - Eleonora Gattoni - Sarah Di Marco - Claudia Delicato - Lars-hakan Thorell - Marco Sarchiapone - Debora Marangon - Patrizia Zeppegno -

 Introduction:
It was estimated that suicide attempts were reported by 6.6% of patients with past-year major depressive disorders. Low electrodermal activity in depressed patients was first described more than 100 years ago. The literature suggests that a history of suicide attempts is significantly related to electrodermal hyporeactivity. The outcome of the disease and the impact of depressive symptoms on suicidal ideation may be moderated by resilience which refers to the ability to maintain or regain mental health despite experiencing adversity. Resilience may be influenced by innate characteristics, such as personality traits, gender, race, or by the subject’s character development over time, for example social attachment and relationship, coping strategies and adaptability.
 Goals:
To compare electrodermal hyporeactive subjects and reactive ones in a sample of depressed patients, in order to assess the possible correlations among attempted suicide, electrodermal activity and personal characteristics of resilience, coping strategies, perceived quality of life and personality features.
 Methodology:
We recruited patients with Bipolar or Unipolar Depressive Disorders. Patients filled in the Resilience Scale for Adult, the Brief Cope Scale, the Short Form Health Survey and the Temperament and Character Inventory test. For each patient we performed the EDORTM test in order to assess electrodermal activity and we collected data about socio-demographic, clinical features and history of suicide attempts.
 Results:
Data collection is still ongoing. According to the Literature, we expect to find no clinical differences between hyporeactive and reactive patients as regards gender and clinical severity of depressive episode. However, we hypothesize that suicide attempts in the group of hyporeactive patients would be characterized by planning and greater severity. Moreover, we expect lower levels of resilience in those patients who are hyporeactive and attempted suicide.
 Conclusions:
Clinical implications will be discussed.
 References:
1. Zeppegno P, Gramaglia C, Castello LM, Bert F, Gualano MR, Ressico F, Coppola I, Avanzi GC, Siliquini R, Torre E. Suicide attempts and emergency room psychiatric consultation. BMC Psychiatry 2015 Feb 5;15:13. 2. Thorell LH, Wolfersdorf M, Straub R, Steyer J, Hodgkinson S, Kaschka WP, Jandl M. Electrodermal hyporeactivity as a trait marker for suicidal propensity in uni- and bipolar depression. J Psychiatr Res 2013 Dec;47(12):1925-31. 3. Deegan PE. The importance of personal medicine: A qualitative study of resilience in people with psychiatric disabilities. Scand J Public Health Suppl 2005 Oct;66:29-35. 4. Patel V, Goodman A. Researching protective and promotive factors in mental health. Int J Epidemiol 2007 Aug;36(4):703-7.


(284) PO-284. Mental Health Service Utilization of Individuals at Risk for Suicide: The role of family support

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Dana Alonzo . Fordham University, NY-USA
-

 Introduction:
Up to 60% of attempters fail to attend treatment one week after discharge from an emergency room. Suicidal individuals demonstrate cognitive impairments such as poor problem-solving skills and impairments in decision-making abilities. These deficits prevent them from forming accurate representations of problems and from making effective decisions about how to address these problems. This may be why it is difficult for suicide attempters to engage in treatment. They may not consider treatment a potential solution to their problems, or, they may not be motivated to attend treatment when they are unable to recognize that a positive outcome may result.
 Goals:
The current study examines correlates of mental health service utilization among clients at high risk for suicide receiving treatment in an outpatient mental health center.
 Methodology:
We conducted a systematic chart review of 44 clients to examine clinical (i.e., diagnosis, length of time in treatment, number of prior attempts, severity of symptomatology) and sociodemographic (i.e., age, gender, ethnicity, level of education, social supports) correlates of mental health service utilization. We conducted an ANOVA to determine which, if any, of these factors was related to mental health service utilization.
 Results:
Individuals reporting a having family support were significantly less likely (p=<.05) to attend treatment than those who did not report having family support 69% vs 80%, respectively).
 Conclusions:
Findings suggest that even though individuals may struggle with suicidal thoughts and behaviors, they are less likely to adhere to treatment when they feel they receive family support. This speaks to the importance of involving family members in the treatment process in order to bolster the client’s adherence to outpatient treatment. Family can be in a unique position to meaningfully encourage clients to attend sessions and to reinforce why attending treatment is important and how it can be benefical.


(296) PO-296. Protective factors for familial transmission of suicidal behaviour

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Lilian Zoellner . Centre for Suicide Research, Denmark, Odense - Denmark
-

 Introduction:
Protective factors for familial transmission of suicidal behaviour Lillian Zoellner, director of Centre for Suicide Research, Denmark, Ph.D. Introduction Several studies show that attempted and/or committed suicides among the immediate family (i.e. parents, siblings or children) constitute a risk factor for the bereaved. Some studies show that genetic risk factors cause familial transmission of suicidal behaviour, others show that environmental factors often are related to risk factors that are heritable. The risk factors are well known whereas research into protective factors for familial transmission of suicidal behaviour is sparse.
 Goals:
This study focuses on circumstances that may contribute to changing the view of life among persons who have experienced suicide of one of their nearest relations. Goals The goal of the study is to identify protective factors for serious suicidal ideation and suicidal behaviour among person bereaved by suicide within the immediate family.
 Methodology:
Data is collected through personal interviews with 20 women and 2 men aged 23 to 65 years. Every interview lasted approximately 2 hours. The interviews have been analysed subsequently.
 Results:
Several of the interviewees have experienced more than one suicide in the immediate family (grandparents, parents, siblings or children). Only very few of the interviewees suffer from suicidal ideation or have attempted suicide themselves. Protective factors for both men and women are ethical considerations about responsibility, i.e. responsibility for life, themselves or the immediate family. Another significant protective factor is having very close friends to confide in. Many state that getting outside into nature is of great importance. Furthermore, some tell that faith, religion, philosophy of life and/or spirituality protect against both suicidal ideation and suicidal behaviour.
 Conclusions:
This research project gives us new knowledge of protective factors for suicidal ideation and suicidal behaviour among persons who have experienced suicide within the immediate family.


(309) PO-309. Substance and internet abuse: What are the effects on suicidal ideation and well-being of adolescents?

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Matilde Bousoño . Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo- Spain
- Susana Al-Halabi - Patricia Burón - Vladimir Carli - Marco Sarchiapone - Danuta Wasserman - Paz García-Portilla - Celso Iglesias - Pilar Alejandra Sáiz - Julio Bobes -

 Introduction:
Substance and Internet addictions, psychopathology and suicidal ideation appear to be related.
 Goals:
The aim of this study is to investigate the association between addictive behavior, suicidal ideation and other psychopathological symptoms within adolescent population.
 Methodology:
The present study was carried out under the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) project, funded by the European Union: The sample is composed of 1026 adolescents aged between 14 and 16 years from 12 public schools in Asturias (530 men and 496 women).
 Results:
In the present study we have obtained the following consumption rates: a) alcohol 11.89% in males and 7.86% in women; b) tobacco: 4.15% and 5.44 in men and women respectively; c) other drugs: 6.98% in males and 4.44% in women; d) maladaptive or pathological use of internet: 14.53% and 20.77% in males and females respectively. We observed a positive association of the presence of suicidal ideation with the following psychopathological variables and substance or behavioral addictions: previous suicide attempts (OR = 10.26), depression (OR = 7.69), maladaptive Internet use (OR = 7.39), peer problems (OR = 3.74), alcohol consumption (OR = 2.78) and emotional symptoms (OR = 2.51).
 Conclusions:
The data suggests that the implementation of policies aimed at restricting maladaptive substance addiction and Internet use could have benefits for public health.
 References:
Carli V, Hoven, CW, Wasserman C, Chiesa F, Guffanti G, Sarchiapone M et al. A newly identified group of adolescents at "invisible" risk for psychopathology and suicidal behavior: findings from the SEYLE study. World Psychiatry. 2014;13:78-86. Kaess M, Durkee T, Brunner R, Carli V, Parzer P, Wasserman C et al. Pathological Internet use among European adolescents: psychopathology and self-destructive behaviours. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014; 23:1093-1102. Wasserman D, Carli V, Wasserman C, Apter A, Balazs J , Bobes J et al. Saving and empowering young lives in Europe (SEYLE): a randomized controlled trial. BMC Public Health. 2010;10: 192.


(310) PO-310. Profile of patients with suicidal behavior history attending a mental health center

Day: 09 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Elsa Arrua Duarte . Hospital Fundación Jimnez Díaz, Madrid- España
- A. Sedano Capdevila - F. Cegla Schvartzman - M. Migoya Borja - N. Palomar Ciria - M.l. Barrigon Estevez - L. Villoria - E. Baca-Garcia - Hospital Universitario Fundación Jiménez Díaz Memind Study Group Psychiatry Department -

 Introduction:
Suicidal behavior includes a range a behaviors, from suicidal ideation to consumed suicide1 and it is one of the most serious psychiatric emergencies2. The study describes risk factors associated with suicidal behavior in patients treated at the Psychiatric Department of Fundación Jiménez Díaz Hospital, by comparing patients with suicide behavior (SA patients) with patients without it (non-SA patients).
 Methodology:
13811 outpatients were recruited from May-2014 to May- 2015, aged 18 to 64, and a descriptive study was made based on suicidal behavior. Sociodemographic variables, clinical global impression scale, stressful life eventsand suicidal thoughts and behavior were collected by the MEmind web application, a data base that continuously collects information of patients in real-time.
 Results:
1181 individuals (8.55%) reported asuicide attempt. When compared by groups, SA patients were significantly younger (44.3vs 47.5; p=0.000),less frequently married (39.8% vs 60.2%; p=0.000 and were more frequently unemployed than non-SA patients (63.1% vs 36.9%; p=0.000). There were no differences according sex (35.7% men vs 38.2% men; p=0.1). SA patients presented amoderate-severe illness more frequently than non-SA patients (68.2% vs 42.8%; p=0.000). Traumatic life events were more frequently described in SA patients (67.6% vs 48.6%; p=0,000). SA patients had more often mental and behavioral disorders such as substance use disorders (SUD), mood and personality disorders than non-SA patients (17.3%, 35.1% and 34.3% respectively vs 6.8%, 10.1% and 22.4%; p=0.000). Neurotic disorders were less frequent in SA patients (34.5% vs 50.5%; p=0,000). We found no differences in schizophrenia and related disorders(11.4% SA patients vs 12% non-SA patients; p=0.563).
 Conclusions:
Patients with suicidal attempts history were younger, unmarried, non-active, had a serious illness and suffered a stressful life event.SUD, affective and personality disorders were more frequent among patients with SA history.
 References:
1.Vallejo J. Introducción a la psiquiatría y a la psicopatología. Ed Masson. España. 2011. 2.Schreiber J, Culpepper L. Suicidal ideation and behavior in adults. UpToDate. 2016


(322) PO-322. The Influence of Bullying on Suicide Responses.

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Martha Cristina Cancino Botello . Consorcio Hospital General Universitario de Valencia , Valencia, Spain
- Juan Miguel Hernández Sánchez - Fernanda Molina López -

 Introduction:
Bullying is a form of aggression in which someone is intentionally intimidated, harassed or harmed. During the last years with the development of new technologies and its accessibility to youth, it has developed a new type of aggression that involves electronic media, also known as cyberbullying. These forms of intimidation may be the cause of mental disturbances, especially anxiety and depression that, in the worst cases, could lead to death. This is why over the last decade there has been increased attention to the association between any bullying involvement and suicidal ideation or behaviors.
 Goals:
Our aim is to determine the relationship between cyber or physical bullying involvement (victim, perpetrator or both) and suicidal behaviors.
 Methodology:
We searched articles in English and Spanish on PubMed database, using the following keywords: Bullying, suicide, children, and adolescent
 Results:
By definition bullying (physical, psychological or electronic media) involves behaviors that must occur repeatedly and systematically against an individual who fails or is unable to defend him/herself. It includes harm, humiliation, suffering, fear and despair for the individual who is the target of aggression. On the other hand, electronic media implies free expression without social control, which have probably influenced the extension of cyberbullying. As a consequence, those who had been involved in any kind of intimidation reported significantly more health and social problems, such as anxiety and depression. Suicidal ideation and suicidal behaviors are frequent outcomes, whether it was a victim or a perpetrator.
 Conclusions:
Victimization or perpetration of bullying in youth is increasing more and more especially by electronic media. It is a vulnerable population to the development of mental disorders or even suicide. It is needed to work hardly on primary prevention and Internet services, and also to create more strict social policies that can diminish this kind of aggression.
 References:
Lemstra ME, Nielsen G, Rogers MR, Thompson AT, Moraros JS. Risk indicators and outcomes associated with bullying in youth aged 9-15 years. Can J Public Health. 2012 Jan-Feb;103(1):9-13. Holt MK, M. Vivolo-Kantor A, Polanin JR, Holland KM, DeGue S, Matjasko JL, Wolfe M, Reid G. Bullying and Suicidal Ideation and Behaviors: A Meta-Analysis. Pediatrics. 2015 Feb; 135(2): 496-511 Borges Bottino, SM Bottino C, Gomez Regina C, Villa Lobo Correia A, Silva Ribeiro W. Cyberbullying and adolescent mental health: systematic review. Cad. Saúde Pública. 2015. Mar; 31(3): 463-475


(324) PO-324. Shame experiences in bereaved by suicide

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Tânia Pinto . Criap , Portugal
-

 Introduction:
One of the most prominent aspects of the reactions of mourning for suicide is the presence of high levels of shame. Shame has a mediator role of vulnerability to psychopathology. As a result of this, the risk of suicide is seen as a strategy to deal with the intense psychological pain and it maximizes the magnitude of the important and serious worldwide public health problem – suicidal behavior.
 Goals:
Systematize and clarify, by revision of literature, the role of shame experiences in the process of mourning for suicide.
 Methodology:
Revision of the literature that is in the database Pubmed, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, PsycARTICLES and Redalyc. Using the key words: “shame on suicide survivors”; “exposed to suicide and shame”; “affected by suicide”, “suicide-bereaved-short term and shame”, “suicide-bereaved-long term and shame”.
 Results:
Shame is a warning sign. It is not generating positive affection in the minds of others. There is the risk of rejection experiences and social exclusion that complicate the process of mourning. Social restrictions, due to vast social repercussions (stigma and social prejudice), increase the feelings of shame, guilt and rejection. Shame reveals itself primordial in the process of understanding suicide and it contributes to explain suicide with its circular effect. The experiences of shame and stigma can promote the disinvestment of the risk of suicide in those bereaved by suicide because of its vigorous moral component.
 Conclusions:
Recent studies show that feelings of shame should be evaluated and they should also have specific intervention. These studies also show that shame is the cause of the difficulties felt in the psychotherapeutic intervention and they refer that we should have prevention programs in order to improve mental health literacy and reduce stigma.
 References:
Wiklander, M., Wilczek, A., Jokinen, J., Nilsonne, A., Rylander, G., Samuelsson, M., Asber, M. (2012). Shame-proneness in attempted suicide patients. BMC Psychiatry, 12, 1-9. Wu A, Wang J-Y, Jia C-X (2015) Religion and Completed Suicide: a Meta-Analysis. Plos one,10(6), e0131715. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0131715


(326) PO-326. Is the Internet a cause, a consequence or a preventive tool for suicide/self-harm behavior?

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Martha Cristina Cancino Botello . Consorcio Hospital General Universitario de Valencia , valencia, Spain
- Fernanda Molina López - Juan Miguel Hernández Sánchez - María De Los Ángeles Canseco Navarro -

 Introduction:
The Internet has brought new forms of social interaction, activities, and communication. People are able to share a variety of information that may have no control. This explains the existence of websites, which are easily accessed online, that encourages and facilitates suicide. Likewise, there are sites with supportive information and advice about self-harm and suicide feelings. Nonetheless, given that youth has such an easy and rapid Internet access, how this amount of contradictory information can affect behavior of this population?
 Goals:
Our aim is to determine the degree in which Internet has influenced youth behavior related to self-harm practice and suicide.
 Methodology:
We searched articles in English and Spanish on PubMed database, using the following keywords: suicide, youth, Internet.
 Results:
The use of Internet in young adults in order to search information related to self-harm or suicide is more frequent on those with suicidal thoughts, suicidal plans, history of self-harm and history of mental illness (especially anxiety, mood or personality disorders). While a smaller proportion of this group of population appear to be more likely to access help sites. The easy access to Internet makes youth very vulnerable to be exposed to this material. It has been described that up to 1% of youth, have visited a website which encourages self-harm or suicide. At the same time, those who have made these kind of searches are 7 to 11 times more likely to have thought about hurting themselves.
 Conclusions:
The use of Internet may be a potentially key factor to assess those individuals with death thoughts, self-harm practices or depressive symptomatology, in order to provide a proper treatment. Policies of Internet service should work hardly to control the access to websites that encourages suicide and self-harm and to facilitate and promote access to helpful and supportive sites.
 References:
Mars B, Heron J, Biddle L, Donovan JL, Holley R, Piper M, Potokar J, Wyllie C, Gunnell D. Exposure to, and searching for, information about suicide and self-harm on the Internet: Prevalence and predictors in a population based cohort of young adults. J. Affect. Disord. 2015 Jun; 185: 239-245. Mitchell KJ, Wells M, Priebe G, Ybarra ML. Exposure to websites that encourage self-harm and suicide: Prevalence rates and association with actual thoughts of self-harm and thoughts of suicide in the United States. Journal of Adolescence. 2014 Oct; 37: 1335-1344. Lewis SP, Baker TG, The possible risks of self-injury web sites: a content analysis. Arch. Suicide Res. 2011. 15: 390–396.


(337) PO-337. Investigating the association between sleep problems and self-harm in Scottish adolescents

Day: 09 | Time: 10:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Kirsten Russell . University of Strathclyde, Glasgow-Scotland
- Susan Rasmussen - Simon C Hunter -

 Introduction:
Suicidal and self-harming behaviours (SSHBs) represent a major public health concern, particularly during adolescence(1). There is a need to identify risk factors for the development of these behaviours in young people. Research has repeatedly highlighted a significant link between sleep problems and SSHBs(2). However, the majority of these studies have relied upon brief measures of global sleep that do not tap into the complexity of poor sleep. The distinctiveness of sleep disturbance subtypes, and their associated treatments, justifies a need to evaluate each of these subtypes in relation to SSHBs.
 Goals:
This investigation aimed to: 1. Evaluate whether distinctive subtypes of sleep disturbance can be identified within a sample of adolescents. 2. Assess the nature of the association between subtypes of sleep disturbance and SSHBs.
 Methodology:
15 and 16 year olds (n=1046) from Scottish secondary schools completed a questionnaire battery including questions measuring self –reported self-harm (with and without suicidal intent), demographics, and sleep. More specifically, questions assessed sleep patterns (bed-time, rise-time and sleep duration on school-days and weekends) and sleep quality (weekly sleep loss, insomnia and nightmares).
 Results:
K-means cluster analysis identified three distinct subgroups of sleep disturbance: 1)consistently good sleepers (60.8%), 2)consistently poor sleepers (8.7%), and 3)poorer weekday/better weekend sleepers (30.45%). Rates of self-harm were highest in individuals who were consistently poor sleepers (42.2%). This was also the case with regards to suicide-attempts (18.9%).
 Conclusions:
These findings provide novel insights into the relationship between sleep and SSHBs by examining how specific presentations of sleep disturbance could contribute to risk in adolescents. Future research in this area could inform the development of specific sleep interventions to combat SSHBs.
 References:
O’Connor RC,Rasmussen S,Miles J,Hawton K.Self-harm in adolescents:self-report survey in schools in Scotland.The British Journal of Psychiatry.2009Jan 1;194(1):68-72. Pigeon WR,Pinquart M,Conner K.Meta-analysis of sleep disturbance and suicidal thoughts and behaviors.The Journal of clinical psychiatry.2012 Sep 15;73(9):1-478.


(341) PO-341. Mental wellbeing as a potential protective factor for suicidal and self-harming behaviours

Day: 09 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Kirsten Russell . University of Strathclyde, Glasgow-Scotland
- Susan Rasmussen - Simon C Hunter -

 Introduction:
Suicidal and self-harming behaviours (SSHBs) represent significant public health concerns, particularly during adolescence. There is a pressing need to increase understanding regarding the development of these behaviours in order to enhance prevention efforts. There is a body of research focussing on risk factors associated with SSHBs. However, protective factors have received less attention within the literature. There is increasing interest in the concept of positive mental health (mental wellbeing) and its contribution to a range of life outcomes(1). However, to our knowledge, no research has examined the relationship between mental wellbeing and SSHBs.
 Goals:
This investigation set out to examine the nature of the relationship between mental wellbeing and SSHBs, within an adolescent population, in order to determine if increased mental wellbeing could represent a potential protective factor for these behaviours.
 Methodology:
15 and 16 year old volunteers (n=1046) from Scottish secondary schools completed a questionnaire battery including questions measuring self-reported self-harm (with and without suicidal intent), mental wellbeing, and demographics. Mental wellbeing was assessed using the short version of the Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS) which has been validated for adolescents(2).
 Results:
Increased levels of mental wellbeing were associated with lower odds of suicidal (OR: 0.788, 95% CI 0.737-0.842, p<.001) and self-harming behaviour (OR: 0.810, 95% CI 0.775-0.847, p<.001). These associations remained significant when controlling for age and gender.
 Conclusions:
These findings provide novel insights into positive mental well-being as a factor that could potentially protect against the development of SSHBs. Mental wellbeing can be improved and, therefore, may offer a potential modifiable target for interventions seeking to tackle SSHBs.
 References:
1)Herrman H,Saxena S,Moodie R.Promoting mental health:concepts,emerging evidence,practice:a report of the World Health Organization.World Health Organization;2005. 2)Clarke A,Friede T,Putz R,Ashdown J,Martin S,Blake A, et al. Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (WEMWBS):validated for teenage school students in England and Scotland. BMC Public Health.2011 Jun 21;11(1):487.


(344) PO-344. Examining levels of defeat and entrapment in first-time and repeat episode self-harm

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Kirsten Russell . University of Strathclyde, Glasgow-Scotland
- Susan Rasmussen - Simon C Hunter -

 Introduction:
Defeat and entrapment are predictors of suicidal behaviour. Research grounded within the Integrated Motivational-Volitional Model of Suicidal Behaviour demonstrated that levels of defeat and entrapment do not distinguish between adolescents who have seriously considered self-harm but have not acted on these thoughts and adolescents who have actually engaged in self-harm(1). However, it is unclear whether levels of defeat and entrapment differ between adolescents who report first time and repeat episode self-harm
 Goals:
This investigation aimed to examine whether levels of defeat and entrapment differed between adolescents who had 1)never self-harmed (controls), 2)had self-harmed once only or 3)had a history of repeated self-harm. Previous research demonstrated that adults reporting first-time and repeat episode self-harm differ on levels of defeat and entrapment(2). Young people are particularly vulnerable to self-harm. Therefore, investigating this research question specifically in adolescents is justified.
 Methodology:
15 and 16 year olds (n=1046) from Scottish secondary schools completed a questionnaire battery including questions measuring self-reported self-harm (with and without suicidal intent), entrapment, defeat and demographics.
 Results:
All three participant groups were found to differ significantly in terms of defeat and entrapment. Further analysis revealed that both self-harm groups were significantly higher than controls on both measures. In addition, adolescents reporting repeated episodes of self-harm demonstrated higher levels of defeat and entrapment than those who had harmed themselves on one occasion.
 Conclusions:
These findings extend knowledge and understanding regarding adolescent self-harm and reinforce evidence from previous research highlighting differences in defeat and entrapment between individuals endorsing first-time and repeat episode self-harm.
 References:
1) O'Connor RC,Rasmussen S,Hawton K.Distinguishing adolescents who think about self-harm from those who engage in self-harm.The British Journal of Psychiatry.2012 Apr1;200(4):330-5. 2)Rasmussen SA,Fraser L,Gotz M,MacHale S,Mackie R,Masterton G et al.Elaborating the cry of pain model of suicidality:testing a psychological model in a sample of first‐time and repeat self‐harm patients.British Journal of Clinical Psychology.2010 Mar1;49(1):15-30.


(347) PO-347. Associations between physical behaviour patterns and levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms in middle-aged adults.

Day: 09 | Time: 10:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Christina Dillon . NATIONAL SUICIDE RESEARCH FOUNDATION, CORK
-

 Introduction:
Physical activity has been identified as a protective factor against many adverse health outcomes including depression and anxiety.
 Goals:
The aim of this paper is to examine the compositional effects of physical behaviour on mental health.
 Methodology:
Participants were 475 (59.7, SD: 5.5 years) middle-aged adults. Participants wore the wrist GENEActiv accelerometer for 7-consecutive days. Data were summarised into 60s epochs and activity intensity categorised as sedentary behaviour, light or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) based on validated thresholds. Levels of depressive and anxiety symptoms were assessed using the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CESD) scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) respectively. Single, partition and isotemporal substitution models were analysed. Isotemporal substitution examined the associations between replacing 10 minutes/day of sedentary behaviour with equal amounts of light activity and MVPA on levels of depressive and anxiety symptoms.
 Results:
In single model analysis, light activity was negatively associated with levels of anxiety (B=-0.06; 95% Confidence Interval (CI), -0.12 to -0.0002) and depressive symptoms (B=-0.17; 95%CI, -0.34 to -0.006). No significant associations were observed for sedentary behaviour and MVPA (P>0.05). Results of both partition and isotemperol models showed significant negative associations with levels of anxiety when 10 minutes of sedentary behaviour were substituted with 10 minutes of light activity (B=-0.08; 95%CI, -0.16to-0.006 and B=-0.09; 95%CI, -0.16 to -0.009 respectively). No statistically significant associations were observed when sedentary behaviour was replaced with MVPA (P>0.05).
 Conclusions:
Substituting light activity for sedentary behaviour may have positive effects on depressive and anxiety symptoms among middle-aged adults.


(351) PO-351. Demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients treated in psychiatric consult a general hospital for attempted suicide

Day: 09 | Time: 10:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Rafael Ángel Baena Mures . Hospital Universitario Clínico San Carlos, Madrid-Spain
- Yolanda Lázaro Pascual - Luis Olivares Gerechter - Diana Gimeno Alvarez - Julia Del Río Vega - Lluis Niell Galmes -

 Introduction:
Introduction Suicide attempt with high lethality have been interacting with certain clinical and demographic factors such as age, sex, psychopathology and adverse events, among others. Patients treated at the psychiatric consult the Clinical Hospital San Carlos de Madrid after an attempt to provide a good sample for the study of these factors. Describe and analyze demographic and clinical characteristics associated with serious suicide attempts as well as the methods used
 Goals:
Describe and analyze demographic and clinical characteristics associated with serious suicide attempts as well as the methods used.
 Methodology:
Naturalistic observational study, descriptive and retrospective cohort on 23 patients admitted during 2014 in various medical or surgical services of a general hospital as a result of injuries from a suicide attempt
 Results:
Total 23 patients, 61% male, mean age 54.1; 60% required ICU; the most common method consisted of multiple drug intake 40%, 30% associated with toxic, mostly alcohol. Predominant summer and diagnosis of adaptive tables (Acute Stress Reaction and T. Adaptive)
 Conclusions:
As is the case with suicides prevails male and summer. As to the most common method has been from medication, both men and women. We were surprised diagnosis of the most common reactions to stress. We conclude that the findings could guide a progressive change in the presuicidal pathology.
 References:
1.Kumar CT, Mohan R, Ranhit G, Chandrasekaran R: Characteristics of high intent suicide attempters admited to a general hospital J Affect Disord 2006, 91(1):77-81 2.Moscicki E: Epidemiology of suicide. In suicide prevention and intervenction: summary of a workshop. Edited by Goldsmith S. Healt IoMoBaB: National Academy Press; 2001


(356) PO-356. Slapping as a parental disciplinary practice, warm parenting, and bullying involvement in early adolescence: a longitudinal cohort study

Day: 09 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Shinya Fujikawa . Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo - Japan
- Shuntaro Ando - Atsushi Nishida - Kiyoto Kasai -

 Introduction:
Bullying involvement causes severe mental health problems such as suicidality (1–3). Risk factors for bullying in early adolescence, when the prevalence of bullying dramatically increases (4), should be identified to potentially prevent or reduce the incidence of bullying. Although certain parenting styles are known to be associated with bullying (5), the association of slapping as a parental disciplinary practice with early adolescent bullying considering warm parenting (WP) is not sufficiently understood. Using data obtained from a cross-sectional survey (the Tokyo Teen Cohort[TTC]-10) of the general population of 10-year-olds, we have found that the slapping was associated with increased odds of early adolescent bullying, regardless of whether WP was present. Then we have obtained data from prospective cohort study of general population of 12-year-olds (TTC-12) subsequent to the baseline survey (TTC-10).
 Goals:
In this study, using the data from TTC, we aimed to investigate the causality between slapping and early adolescent bullying, while considering how WP affected this association.
 Methodology:
The longitudinal data is composed of TTC-10 data and TTC-12 data (n=1,221, boys [51.8%]). The data were collected from both children and their primary parent using self-administered questionnaires and interviews. Categories of involvement with bullying were characterized as pure victims, pure bullies, and bully-victims. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to explore the association of 10-year-olds’ experience of slapping with 12-year-olds’ bullying considering WP.
 Results:
Slapping at 10-year-olds was associated with increased odds of being pure victims (odds ratio [OR], 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04 to 2.02) or bully-victims (OR, 1.9; 95%CI, 1.13 to 3.07) at 12-year-olds, even after adjusting for WP.
 Conclusions:
Slapping as a parental disciplinary practice predicted later bullying experience in early adolescence. Our study suggests that avoiding parental slapping, regardless of WP, would be helpful for bullying prevention in early adolescence.
 References:
1. Klomek AB, Sourander A, Niemelä S, Kumpulainen K, Piha J, Tamminen T, et al. Childhood bullying behaviors as a risk for suicide attempts and completed suicides: a population-based birth cohort study. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009;48:254–61. 2. Winsper C, Lereya T, Zanarini M, Wolke D. Involvement in bullying and suicide-related behavior at 11 years: a prospective birth cohort study. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2012;51:271-82. 3. Herba CM, Ferdinand RF, Stijnen T, Veenstra R, Oldehinkel AJ, Ormel J, et al. Victimisation and suicide ideation in the TRAILS study: specific vulnerabilities of victims. J Child Psychol Psychiatry Allied Discip. 2008;49:867–76. 4. Finkelhor D, Ormrod RK, Turner HA. The developmental epidemiology of childhood victimization. J Interpers Violence. 2009;24(5):711–31. 5. Lereya ST, Samara M, Wolke D. Parenting behavior and the risk of becoming a victim and a bully/victim: a meta-analysis study. Child Abus Negl. 2013;37(12):1091–108.


(396) PO-396. No Way Out: The interaction of Entrapment and stress as a Facilitator of Suicide Ideation among Military Personnel

Day: 09 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Yossi Levi-Belz . Ruppin Academic Center, Israel
- Lea Shelef - Eyal Fruchter -

 Introduction:
Suicide is a leading and growing cause of death in the military during peacetime. In recent years, a dramatic rise in suicide and suicidal behavior in several militaries have been reported. However, despite significant efforts in the area only scant knowledge is available regarding the processes and facilitator mechanisms by which military service impacts suicide risk.
 Goals:
The purpose of the present study, which is the first in this field addressing a military service population, was to shed light on the contribution of entrapment as an underlying factor influencing and enabling suicidal thoughts in young adult soldiers, beyond the experience of stress, and beyond known protective factors (problem-solving abilities and social support). Understanding of psychological mechanisms and processes experienced by soldiers prior to developing suicidal thoughts can help mental health professional evaluate the risk of suicidal ideation more accurately and assist in developing appropriate suicide-prevention initiatives in the military setting.
 Methodology:
One hundred sixty-eight soldiers (aged 18-21) comprised three groups: suicide attempters (n = 58); those receiving treatment by a mental health professional, reporting no suicidal behavior (n = 58); and controls (n = 50). all of the participants filled our questionnires tapping the research variables of entrapment, stress, Problem-Solving, Social Support and Suicide ideation.
 Results:
In general, the suicidal group scored higher than the two other groups on stress levels and entrapment, while lower than the other two groups in perceived problem-solving abilities and perceived social support. Moreover, the interaction of stress and entrapment predict suicide ideation beyond stress, protective factors, and entrapment alone.
 Conclusions:
Entrapment is an important predictor of suicide ideation and can serve as a moderator, in that its presence may exacerbate the harsh situation of subjective stress within the military context and intensify it into a suicide risk.


(427) PO-427. Hypocholesterolemia as risk factor of high suicide rate in ICU patients of the Central University Hospital of Asturias

Day: 10 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Aitana M. González Álvarez . Área Sanitaria VIII, Langreo, Asturias, Spain
- Lucía Viña Soria - Esther Torío Ojeda -

 Introduction:
Several studies suggest the possibility that the lowering of serum cholesterol concentration could predispose individuals to suicide. The variation of the serum cholesterol concentration could alter the fluidity, viscosity, and function of the neuronal membranes; these changes could be relevant for neurotransmitters like serotonin. Plasma cholesterol could be a sign of suicide behavior predisposition, as its study is available and easy to find in Spanish health centres.
 Goals:
Plan the hypothesis on the relation between the low serum cholesterol concentration and the high-lethality suicide attempts that require hospitalization and ICU medical care.
 Methodology:
Patients who were hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit of the Central University Hospital of Asturias after a serious suicide attempt and, who accepted through delegation their participation, were included into the study. Sociodemographic clinic data were collected and the evaluation of the suicide behavior using the Lethality Rating Scale and Method attempt coding. A sample of either vein or arterial blood was taken from each patient during the first 24 hours after being checked in in order to measure levels of total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride in the biochemical clinic of CUHA.
 Results:
2 Cases of high-lethality suicide attempts are described (method 5-drawning- and method 7 –defenestration-, with lethality level of 08 and 07, respectively) with a low serum cholesterol count (less than 150 mg/dl).
 Conclusions:
Remarkable data of low serum cholesterol count were found in the initial selection of high-lethality suicide attempts patients, however it is necessary to accurately determine its predictive capacity.


(429) PO-429. Alexithymia as a suicide risk factor among college students: A pilot study

Day: 09 | Time: 13:30 | Room: Poster Hall

Topic: Psychosocial variables: protective and risk factors. Resilience & vulnerability

Authors:Mark Loftis . Tennessee Technological University, USA
- Derrick L. Edwards -

 Introduction:
Suicide is one of the leading causes of death in college students in the United States. Alexithymia has been associated with increased risk of suicide in clinical populations. Few studies have examined the possible relationship between Alexithymia and suicide risk in nonclinical populations, specifically among college students.
 Methodology:
A sample of 114 college students from a public university in Southeastern United States participated in the study via a web-based survey. The Suicide Behaviors Questionnaire – Revised SBQ-R), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale – 20, (TAS-20), the Adverse Childhood Experiences Scale (ACES), and the Ego Resilience Scale (ERS) were used in the study.
 Results:
The majority of the participants were females (68.4%) and Caucasian (85%). Average age of participants across gender classification was 20.7 (SD = 4.7) years. Past suicidal behaviors including planning (n = 20), disclosing a suicide plan (n = 24), and actual suicide attempts (n = 6), were reported by the participants. Using the SBQ-R, 37% (n = 48) of participants were considered at risk for suicidal behaviors. Average alexithymia scores of the current sample (M = 47.44) were consistent with the validation sample and are within the “non-alexithymia” range. Also, ego-resiliency scores (M = 41.86) indicated the current sample had high resiliency traits. As expected, a positive correlation was found between alexithymia and suicide risk. Alexithymia was also significantly, yet negatively correlated, with ego-resiliency. Additionally, no relationship was found between alexithymia and adverse childhood experiences. Ego-resiliency was negatively correlated with adverse childhood experiences, but not a significant predictor of suicide-risk. However, adverse childhood experiences were a significantly correlated with suicide risk. Lastly, when loaded into a regression model, alexithymia and adverse childhood experiences account for 25% of suicide risk variance.
 Conclusions:
The preliminary results of the current study are promising and support further inquiry. Understanding the historical and emotional factors that help predict suicide risk could identify individuals in need of intervention prior to a suicide attempt. Screening for alexithymia and adverse childhood experiences should become standard practice when assessing for risk of suicide.
 References:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2007). Web-based injury statistics query reporting system (WISQARS). Retrieved from www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/pdf/ Death_by_age_2007-BW-a.pdf.

Evren, C. & Evren B. (2006). The relationship of suicide attempt history with childhood
abuse, neglect, alexithymia and temperament and character dimensions of
personality in substance dependence. NORD Journal of Psychiatry, 60, 263-269.
doi10.1080/08039480600790051.